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Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 - Summary



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Message by
Transportation Secretary Skinner
Summary of
The Intermodal Surface Transportation
Efficiency Act of 1991



The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, signed
into law by President Bush in December 1991, establishes a new vision
for surface transportation in America.  It represents a victory for
the Nation, its citizens, and our economic vitality.  The Bill
embodies one of the President's top domestic agenda items: the
renewal of our surface transportation programs to address the
changing needs for America's will create jobs reduce congestion, and
rebuild our infrastructure. it will help maintain mobility. it will
help State and local governments address environmental issues. 
Finally, it will ensure America's ability to compete in the global
marketplace of the 21st Century.

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     Overall, this landmark Bill embodies the President's vision and
direction as stated in his National Transportation Policy.  It
maintains and expands the Nation's Transportation system; fosters a
sound financial base for transportation; keeps the industry strong
and competitive; promotes safety; protects the environment and
improves the quality of life; and advances U.S. technology and
expertise.

To all our partners in the transportation community, who worked so
hard and long for this Bill, best wishes for every success as you
take this Bill and create our transportation system of the 21st
Century.


                                                   Samuel K. Skinner
                                         Secretary of Transportation


                              CONTENTS


TITLE I - SURFACE TRANSPORTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
     National Highway System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
     Interstate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
     Surface Transportation Program (STP). . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
     Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
     Improvement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
     Bridge Replacement and
     Rehabilitation Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
     Federal Lands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
     Special Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
     Equity Adjustment Categories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Other Important Provisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
     Eligible Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
     Metropolitan Planning and Project Selection . . . . . . . . .14
     Statewide Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
     Management Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
     Program Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
     Toll Roads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
     Congestion Pricing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
     Outdoor Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
     National Maximum Speed Limit
     Compliance Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
     Congressional Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

TITLE II - HIGHWAY SAFETY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

     Motor Vehicle Safety and Cost Savings . . . . . . . . . . . .19
     State and Community Grants -  
          402 Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
     Safety Research and Development -  
          403 Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
     Alcohol-Impaired Driving Incentive Grant - 
          410 Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
     Drug Recognition Expert
          Training Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
     National Driver Register Act. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20


TITLE III - FEDERAL TRANSIT ACT
     AMENDMENTS OF 1991. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Transit Formula Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Section 3 Discretionary and
     Formula Capital Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
     New Starts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
     Rail Modernization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
     Bus and Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Matching Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Transit Planning and Research Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

TITLE IV - MOTOR CARRIER ACT OF 1991 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP). . . . . . . . . .27
State Participation in IRP and IFTA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Single-State Registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Longer Combination Vehicles (LCV). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

TITLE V - INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

TITLE VI - RESEARCH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
     PART A - PROGRAMS, STUDIES,
     AND ACTIVITIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
     Research and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
     International Highway Transportation
     Outreach Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
     Bureau of Transportation Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
     National Transit Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
     University Transportation
     Centers/Research Institutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
     PART B - INTELLIGENT VEHICLE- HIGHWAY SYSTEMS (IVHS). . . . .33
     PART C - ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION
     SYSTEMS AND ELECTRIC VEHICLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

TITLE VII - AIR TRANSPORTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

TITLE VIII - EXTENSION OF
     HIGHWAY-RELATED TAXES AND
     HIGHWAY TRUST FUND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

TABLES

1 - Authorizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39
                                                               40-41
2 - Federal Share and Availability
     for Significant Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42


                                  4


Intermodal
Surface Transportation
Efficiency Act of 1991


     On December 18, 1991, the President signed the Intermodal
Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 providing
authorizations for highways, highway safety, and mass
transportation for the next 6 years.  Total funding of about $155
billion will be available in fiscal years (FY) 1992-1997. (See
authorization table on pages 38-41 for a summary of funding by
program.)

     The purpose of the Act is clearly enunciated in its statement
of policy:

     "to develop a National Intermodal Transportation System that
     is economically efficient, environmentally sound, provides the
     foundation for the Nation to compete in the global economy and
     will move people and goods in an energy efficient manner"

     The provisions of the Act reflect these important policy
goals.  Some of the major features include:

-    A National Highway System (NHS), consisting primarily of
     existing Interstate routes and a portion of the Primary
     System, is established to focus Federal resources on roads
     that are the most important to interstate travel and national
     defense, roads that connect with other modes of
     transportation, and are essential for international commerce.

-    State and local governments are given more flexibility in
     determining transportation solutions, whether transit or
     highways, and the tools of enhanced planning and management
     systems to guide them in making the best choices.

-    New technologies, such as intelligent vehicle highway systems
     and prototype magnetic levitation systems, are funded to push
     the Nation forward into thinking of new approaches in
     providing 21st Century transportation.

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-    The private sector is tapped as a source for funding
     transportation improvements.  Restrictions on the use of
     Federal funds for toll roads have been relaxed and private
     entities may even own such facilities.

-    The Act continues discretionary and formula funds for mass
     transit.

-    Highway funds are available for activities that enhance the
     environment, such as wetland banking, mitigation of damage to
     wildlife habitat, historic sites, activities that contribute
     to meeting air quality standards, a wide range of bicycle and
     pedestrian projects, and highway beautification.

-    Highway safety is further enhanced by a new program to
     encourage the use of safety belts and motorcycle helmets.

-    State uniformity in vehicle registration and fuel tax
     reporting is required.  This will ease the recordkeeping and
     reporting burden on businesses and contribute substantially to
     increased productivity of the truck and bus industry.

     The bill's comprehensive coverage is reflected in its eight
titles:

TITLE 1 --
     Surface Transportation (related to highways)

TITLE II --
     Highway Safety

TITLE III
     Federal Transit Act Amendments of 1991

TITLE IV --
     Motor Carrier Act of 1991

TITLE V --
     Intermodal Transportation

TITLE VI --
     Research

TITLE VII --
     Air Transportation

TITLE VIII --

     Extension of Highway-Related Taxes and Highway Trust Fund.

                                  6


TITLE I

Surface Transportation


     This title covers matters relating mainly to highways,
generally administered by the Federal Highway Administration
(FHWA).  Authorizations of $121 billion are provided in this title
through programs that have been dramatically restructured from
previous highway law.  Some of the program funds are distributed
through procedures that are significantly different from the
formulas of the past.  Layered on these differences are revised
program eligibilities and requirements.

PROGRAMS

     The Federal-Aid Highway Program, for the past 20 years, had
been directed primarily toward the construction and improvement of
four Federal-aid systems - Interstate, Primary, Secondary and Urban
which constituted about 851,000 miles of the 3.9 million miles of
roads in the United States.  Now, instead of four Federal-aid
systems, there are two systems:

         the National Highway System, and
         the Interstate System, which is a component of the NHS.

     Plus, a new block grant type program, the Surface
Transportation Program, will be available for all roads not
functionally classified as local or rural minor collector.  Thus,
the Federal-aid program will encompass about 920,000 miles and will
be based on a new framework.

     The major Federal-aid programs are discussed below.  For a
more complete list of authorizations and programs refer to Table I
on pages 38-41.  Federal shares and availability periods are also
shown on Table 2 on page 42.

National Highway System

     The National Highway System will consist of 155,000 miles
(plus or minus 15 percent) of major roads in the United States. 
Included will be all Interstate routes, a large percentage of urban
and rural principal arterials,

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the defense strategic highway network, and strategic highway
connectors.  The system, which will be proposed by the Secretary of
Transportation, after consultation with the States, must be
designated by law by September 30, 1995.  In the interim, the NHS
will consist of highways classified as principal arterials.

     The NHS funding level is $21 billion for the 6 years.  The
formula for distribution is the same as for the Surface
Transportation Program (STP) program (see discussion below).  A
State may choose to transfer 50 percent of the NHS funds to the new
STP program; if the Secretary approves, 100 percent may be
transferred.

Interstate

     Although a part of the NHS, the Interstate System will retain
its separate identity and will receive separate funding.  Provided
is:

         Complete funding of Interstate Construction ($7.2
          billion).

         Interstate Substitute highway projects ($960 million)
          (Interstate Substitute transit projects are funded at
          $325 million in Title 111).

         An Interstate Maintenance program, at a total of $17
          billion, finances projects to rehabilitate, restore, and
          resurface the Interstate System.  Reconstruction is also
          eligible if it does not add capacity.  However, high-
          occupancy-vehicle - HOV - and auxiliary lanes can be
          added.

     The formulas for the three Interstate programs are
basically the same as in previous law.  Interstate Construction and
Interstate Substitute are based on an estimate of cost to complete. 
The factors used for Interstate Maintenance, like the previous
Interstate Resurfacing, Restoration, Rehabilitation, and
Reconstruction, (4R) program, are lane miles and vehicle miles
travelled.

Surface Transportation Program

     The Surface Transportation Program (STP) is a new block grant
type program that may be used by the States and localities for any
roads (including NHS) that are not functionally classified as local
or rural minor collectors.  These roads are now collectively
referred to as Federal-aid

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roads.  Bridge projects paid for with STP funds are not restricted
to Federal-aid roads but may be on any public road.  Transit
capital projects are also eligible under this program.

     The total funding for the STP over the 6 years is $23.9
billion.  However, this level may be augmented by the transfer of
funds from other programs and by the equity funds (Donor State
Bonus, Reimbursement, Hold Harmless, and 90 Percent of Payments)
which may be used as if they were STP funds.  In addition, Minimum
Allocation funds may be used for STP projects, as well as for
projects under certain other categories.

     The formula for distribution of funds is based on each State's
FY 1987-1991 share of total national funding with appropriate
adjustment for Interstate Maintenance and Bridge apportionments.

     Once the funds are distributed to the States, each State must
set aside 10 percent for safety construction activities, i.e.,
hazard elimination and rail-highway crossings, and 10 percent for
transportation enhancements, which encompass a broad range of
environmental-related activities.  The State must divide 50 percent
(62.5 percent of remaining 80 percent) of the funds by population
between each of its areas over 200,000 and the remaining areas of
the State.  The remaining 30 percent (37.5 percent of remaining 80
percent) can be used in any area of the State.  Areas of 5,000
population or less are guaranteed an amount based on previous
Secondary funding.

Congestion Mitigation and
Air Quality Improvement Program

     The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program
directs funds toward transportation projects in Clean Air Act non-
attainment areas for ozone and carbon monoxide.  These projects
will contribute to meeting the attainment of national ambient area
air quality standards.  If a State has none of these non-attainment
areas, the funds may be used as if they were STP funds.

     Total funding for the program is $6 billion.  The funds are
distributed based on each State's share of the population of air
quality non-attainment areas weighted by degree of air pollution. 
A 1/2 percent minimum apportionment is guaranteed to each State.

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Bridge Replacement and Rehabilitation Program

     The Bridge Replacement and Rehabilitation Program is continued
at a total authorization level of $16.1 billion to provide
assistance for any bridge on a public road.  The program is
basically unchanged from previous years in its formula and
requirements.  However, newly eligible are bridge painting, seismic
retrofitting, and calcium magnesium applications.  A bridge
discretionary program is continued, with a new timber bridge
component, with $400 million in funding.  Forty percent of a
State's bridge funds may be transferred to the NHS or the STP; the
transferred amounts are not subject to the STP set-asides and sub-
State distribution requirements.

Federal Lands

     The Federal Lands Program authorizations, previously available
through four categories, are now provided through three categories

    Indian Reservation Roads,
    Parkways and Park Roads, and
    Public Lands Highways, which incorporates the previous Forest
     Highway category.

     Total funding for Federal Lands is $2.6 billion.  The
funds are allocated on the basis of relative needs.  The Forest
Highway portion of Public Lands Highways and the Indian Reservation
Roads authorizations are allocated by administrative formula.

Special Programs

-    Special Projects - There are 539 Congressionally-designated
     highway projects in 6 broad groups:

    High Cost Bridge;
    Congestion Relief;
    High Priority Corridors on NHS;
    Rural and Urban Access;
    Priority Intermodal; and
    Innovative Projects.

     There are other special projects and provisions throughout the
Act that receive separate funding, some with contract authority
from the Highway Trust Fund and some requiring annual
appropriations.

10


-    National High-Speed Ground Transportation Programs - A
     magnetic levitation (Maglev) prototype development program is
     authorized at a sum of $725 million ($500 million from the
     Trust Fund and $225 million from the general fund).  These
     funds will be directed toward the development of one prototype
     project, selected from applicants across the Nation.

     A separately funded ($25 million from the Highway Trust Fund
     and $25 million from the general fund) high- speed ground
     transportation demonstration program will fund selected
     projects that demonstrate new technologies related to any
     high-speed ground transportation projects, rail or maglev,
     already under construction or in operation.

-    Scenic Byways Program - Grant funds totaling $50 million are
     authorized for the planning, design, and development of State
     scenic byway programs.  In addition, an interim Scenic Byways
     grant program is funded at $30 million to allow States to
     undertake scenic byways projects.  Scenic byways,
     additionally, may be funded through the 10 percent set-aside
     of STP funds for enhancement activities.

-    Use of Safety Belts and Motorcycle Helmets - The Act permits
     the Secretary to provide grants to States that enact
     motorcycle helmet and safety belt use laws.  To carry out this
     program an authorization of $17 million is provided in the
     first year.
     Thereafter, the program will be funded by set-asides from
     Section 402 funds totalling $48 million.  States that do not
     enact these laws by FY 1994 will have penalties applied to
     their STP, NHS, and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
     funds.  The penalty amounts must be transferred and used for
     the State's 402 Safety program.

-    National Recreational Trails Funding Program - Recreational
     trails for non-motorized and motorized uses will be funded
     from the Highway Trust Fund (see Title VIII discussion). 
     Funds will be allocated to the States based in part on the
     amount of nonhighway recreational fuel use and may be used for
     a variety of activities to construct and maintain recreational
     trails.  The program will be administered by the Department of
     Transportation (DOT) in consultation with the Department of
     the Interior.

                                 11
Equity Adjustment Categories

     Equity adjustment categories are the funds that were
legislated to achieve equity in funding levels among the States. 
They cannot be considered programs because they are not directed
toward a particular group of roads or activities.  However, they do
represent amounts of funds that will be distributed to the States. 
Following is a brief description of each category's formula and
eligible uses.

-    90 Percent Minimum Allocation - Each State is guaranteed an
     amount to ensure that a State's percentage of its total
     apportionments and prior year allocations for the base
     programs (Interstate Construction, Interstate Maintenance,
     Interstate Substitute, NHS, STP, Bridge, Scenic Byways, and
     Safety Belt and Motorcycle Helmet grants) equal 90 percent
     (compared to 85 percent in previous law) of the percentage of
     its estimated contributions to the Highway Account of the
     Highway Trust Fund.  One half of the amount distributed to
     each State is subject to the sub-State distribution rules of
     the STP.

-    Minimum Allocation funds may be used for the following:
     Interstate, Interstate Substitute, Bridge, NHS, STP,
     Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality, Hazard Elimination, and
     Rail Highway Crossing projects.

-    Donor State Bonus - Donor States (those that contribute more
     to the Highway Trust Fund than they receive back in Federal-
     aid highway programs) receive a predetermined amount ($3
     billion dollars over the 6 years) based on a comparison of a
     projection of all payments into the Highway Trust Fund and the
     amount received in Federal-aid apportionments.  Starting with
     the State with the lowest return, States are brought up to the
     level of return for States with the next higher level of
     return until available funds are depleted.

-    These bonus amounts effectively are treated as STP funds,
     except that the amounts are available until expended and one-
     half of the amount is subject to the sub-State distribution
     rules of the STP.

-    Reimbursement - This category reflects each State's share of
     the cost of routes incorporated into the Interstate System in
     1956.  For each of FYs 1996 and

                                 12

     1997, $2 billion is authorized.  A 1/2 percent minimum
     apportionment is guaranteed to each State.

     These funds are transferred to the STP; however, one-half of
     the amount will not be subject to the set-asides and sub-State
     distribution requirements of the STP.

-    Hold Harmless - The Act establishes a legislative percentage
     each State must receive of the Nation's funding annually.  The
     funding programs included in this adjustment process, which
     includes apportionments and prior year allocations, are:
     Interstate Construction, Interstate Maintenance, NHS, STP,
     Congestion and Air Quality, Interstate Substitution, Bridge,
     Minimum Allocation, Federal Lands, Reimbursement, and Donor
     State Bonus.

     Additions are made to the STP apportionment so that each
     State's total will achieve the legislative percentage.  One-
     half of Hold Harmless funds received is subject to the set-
     asides and sub-State distribution requirements of the STP. 
     The 90 percent guarantee and priority projects are not
     included in this hold harmless adjustment.

-    90 Percent of Payments Guarantee -
     This category guarantees all States 90 cents in return for
     every dollar they are estimated to have contributed to the
     Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for
     each year of the Act.  The computation is based on all highway
     funds in the bill, except for special projects.

     These also will be used as if they were STP funds; however,
     one-half of the amount is not subject to the set-asides and
     sub-State distribution requirements of the STP.


                                 13


     OTHER IMPORTANT PROVISIONS

     Eligible Activities

     The Act greatly expands the type of projects and activities
that are now eligible under the basic programs.  Some of the
notable eligibilities are:

         Transit capital improvements are eligible for use under
          the STP program, as noted before.  Previous law only
          allowed the Federal-aid Urban Program funds to be used
          for transit capital.  Also, transit projects (and non-NHS
          highway projects) are eligible for NHS funds, under
          certain conditions, in the corridor of fully access-
          controlled NHS routes.

         A State may choose to use an unrestricted amount of NHS
          and STP funds on transportation planning, and research
          and development.  Transit research and development is
          also eligible for STP funds.

         Participation in wetland mitigation efforts is now an
          eligible use of NHS and STP funds.

         Start up costs for traffic management and control
          (limited to 2 years on the NHS) are eligible for both NHS
          and STP funds.

         Improvements necessary to accommodate other
          transportation modes are eligible uses of both NHS and
          STP funds.

Metropolitan Planning and Project Selection

     The metropolitan planning provisions of the Act feature an
enhanced role for local governments.  The metropolitan planning
organization (MPO) is responsible for developing, in cooperation
with the State and affected transit operators, a long-range
transportation plan and a transportation improvement program (TIP)
for the area.  The TIP must be consistent with this plan and must
include all projects in the metropolitan area that are proposed for
funding with either Title 23 or Federal Transit Act monies.

     The planning process must now include additional
considerations such as land use, intermodal connectivity, methods
to enhance transit service, and needs identified through the
management systems.

14

     Projects in areas over 200,000 population, which must be
designated as Transportation Management Areas (TMA), are to be
selected by the MPO in consultation with the State, except that
projects on the NHS, Bridge, and Interstate Maintenance projects
are selected by the State in cooperation with the MPO.  In other
areas, projects are selected by the State in cooperation with the
MPO.

     Metropolitan planning is funded by 1 percent of the funds
authorized for the NHS, STP, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
Program, Interstate Maintenance Program and Bridge Program.  In
addition, metropolitan planning is an eligible activity under the
NHS and STP.

Statewide Planning

Newly required under this Act are:
         a statewide planning process,
         statewide transportation plan, and
         a statewide transportation program.

     The statewide TIP must include all projects in the
State proposed for funding with Title 23 or Federal Transit Act
funds, and must be consistent with the longrange plan.  The States'
funds that are earmarked for planning and research under 23 U.S.C.
307(c)(1), which amount to 2 percent of the major program funds,
are available to carry out the statewide planning requirements,
with some conditions.  Statewide planning also is an eligible
activity under the NHS and STP.

Management Systems

     In addition to carrying out the statewide and metropolitan
planning requirements, the State must develop, establish, and
implement six management systems -
         highway pavement,
         bridge,
         highway safety,
         traffic congestion,
         public transportation facilities and equipment, and
         intermodal transportation facilities and systems.

     The States can finance the management systems with NHS, STP,
Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality, apportioned Bridge, and
Planning funds.


15

     In metropolitan areas, the systems must be developed and
implemented in cooperation with MPO'S, and in TMA's the traffic
congestion management system must be developed through the
transportation planning process.  In TMA's that include non-
attainment areas for ozone and carbon monoxide, highway projects
which significantly increase capacity for single-occupant vehicles
must be part of an approved congestion management system.  Non-
implementation of the systems by FY 1996 will result in a 10
percent penalty of apportioned highway funds and transit funds. 
Additionally, the States shall develop traffic monitoring systems
for highways in keeping with DOT guidelines and requirements.

Program Operation

     States have more responsibility for standards applying to
highways under the new law.  All non-NHS projects must be
constructed in accord with standards established under State law. 
Standards approved by the Secretary need only apply to NHS new
construction, NHS reconstruction and NHS 3R (resurfacing,
restoring, and rehabilitating) on multilane limited-access
highways.

     The States may approve plans, specifications, and estimates
(PS&E) on NHS 3R projects if all work meets or exceeds standards. 
Also, the State can approve PS&E on any NHS project costing less
than $1 million and on all non-NHS projects.

     Certification acceptance is retained substantially as it
existed.  It will apply to all apportioned programs (NHS, STP,
Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality, and Bridge), except for
Interstate projects.  Final inspection of each project is no longer
required.

Toll Roads

     Tolls are permitted to a much greater degree than in the past
on Federal-aid facilities, i.e., roads, bridges and tunnels.  Types
of work that may be done are:

     1)   Initial construction of toll facilities (except for
          Interstate),

     2)   4R work on toll facilities,

     3)   Reconstruction or replacement of free bridges or tunnels
          and conversion to toll facilities,

                                 16

     4)   Reconstruction of free highways (except Interstate roads)
          to convert to toll, and

     5)   preliminary studies to determine the feasibility of the
          above work.

          The tolls may be continued if used for transportation
          purposes under Title 23.

     For the first time private entities may own the toll
facilities.  However, the applicable public authority, regardless
of ownership, must ensure that Title 23 requirements are being
carried out.  A State may loan the Federal share of a project's
cost to another public or a private agency constructing the
project.  Repaid funds may be used for any of the purposes under
the original category from which the loans were made.

Congestion Pricing

     A congestion pricing pilot program that could involve the
imposition of tolls will be initiated and will consist of five
projects.  Up to three of the projects may be on the Interstate
System.  The program will be funded by $25 million of FHWA's
administrative funds for each of the FY's 1992-1997.

Outdoor Advertising

     States may now use their regularly apportioned highway funds
for removal of any lawfully erected nonconforming outdoor
advertising sign, display, or device.  Outdoor advertising controls
will apply to the Interstate System and roads that were on the
Federal-aid Primary System as it existed on June 1, 199 1, and any
highway which is not included above but which is on the NHS.

National Maximum Speed Limit Compliance Program

The Act amends the speed limit law to:

     1)   Make permanent the law allowing 65 mph speed limit on
          some non-Interstate highways that are constructed to
          Interstate standards,

     2)   Provide for data collection on roads posted at
          65 mph as well as 55 mph, and

     3)   Require regulations for a new speed limit monitoring and
          compliance program that will take into account


17


          different types of roads and the degree to which the
          speed limit is exceeded.

     Transfer of funds as determined through rulemaking will be
required if the States fail to enforce the speed limit.  However,
an enforcement moratorium is provided for failure to comply, in FYs
1990 and 1991, with the speed limit requirements in effect before
the Act's effective date.

Congressional Reports

     Contained in this title are 40 special studies and associated
Congressional reports.  These reports range from Allocation
Formulas for Distributing Federal Highway Funds to Feasibility of
Recycling Pavement Material to an International Border
Infrastructure study.
     Most studies are required to be prepared by FHWA in
collaboration with other Federal agencies; some, however, are the
responsibility of other agencies (eg.  General Accounting Office).
     In other titles in the ISTEA, there are an additional 27
Congressionally-required studies and associated reports.


                                 18

TITLE 11

Highway Safety


     The non-construction highway safety programs, which are
covered under this title, are basically unchanged from existing
law.  These provisions are generally administered by the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and FHWA.  A total of
$1.6 billion is authorized.  The major programs are discussed
below; a full listing of authorized programs can be found in the
authorization table on pages 38-41.


MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY AND COST SAVINGS

     The Act provides funding to continue the provisions of the
National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966, and the
Motor Vehicle information and Cost Savings Act.

     The Act includes a number of motor vehicle safety rulemaking
requirements and additional directions for rulemaking, including:

    Rollover protection for occupants of passenger cars,
     multipurpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks.

    Side impact protection for occupants of multipurpose passenger
     vehicles.

    Improved head impact protection (from interior components) for
     occupants of passenger cars.

    Air bag crash protection systems for drivers and right front
     passengers in new passenger cars and new light trucks
     (including light buses) and multipurpose passenger vehicles.


STATE AND COMMUNITY GRANTS - 402 PROGRAM

     The Act expands the list of uniform guidelines for the State
and Community Highway Safety Grant Program under 23 USC 402,
requiring the Secretary to issue guidelines for programs on: speed
limits, occupant protection, impaired driving, motorcycle safety,
school buses, law enforcement services, and the collection and
reporting of data on traffic-related deaths and injuries.

19

     Beginning in FY 1993, the amounts are made available out of
Section 402 authorizations for specific purposes (Section 410
alcohol incentive grants; motorcycle helmet and safety belt use law
grants; and the National Driver Register).

SAFETY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 403 PROGRAM

     Much of the language of Section 403 Highway Safety Research
and Development Program is restated for clarity, but the substance
of the program is not materially affected.

ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED DRIVING
INCENTIVE GRANT - 410 PROGRAM

     The Act revises the existing Section 410 Alcohol Impaired
Driving Incentive Grant Program, making a new 6-year incentive
program.  Under this program the Secretary will make basic and
supplemental grants to States that adopt and implement specific
programs such as prompt suspension of the driver's license of
impaired drivers and mandatory sentences for persons who drive
while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance.

     For FY 1992, $25 million is authorized, and in the next 5
years, a total of $125 million is authorized from the sums made
available for the Section 402 program.

DRUG RECOGNITION EXPERT TRAINING PROGRAM

     A regional program is established to implement drug
recognition programs and for training law enforcement officers to
recognize and identify people operating a motor vehicle while
impaired by alcohol, a controlled substance, or other drug.

NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER ACT

     The National Driver Register Act of 1982 is reauthorized
without change in its provisions.

                                 20

TITLE III

Federal Transit Act
Amendments of 1991


     The transit formula and discretionary programs requirements
and program structure remain basically unchanged from previous law,
but achieve such objectives as transit and highway funding
flexibility and identical matching shares, rail modernization
funding by formula, increased use of the trust fund, and an
expanded research program.  However, a number of programs,
including planning and research, are now funded as percentage
takedowns from the total amount of funding provided rather than as
separate line items.

     Reflecting the broader mandates of the transit program, the
Urban Mass Transportation Administration, who generally administer
these provisions, is renamed the Federal Transit Administration
(FTA).

     A total of $31.5 billion is authorized over the
6 year period of the Act.  Of this amount $18.2 billion (58
percent) is to come from the Mass Transit Account of the Highway
Trust Fund and is contract authority.  The remaining $13.3 billion
is authorization of appropriations from the general fund.  The
authorization table on pages 38-41 lists all the programs and
funding by year.

TRANSIT FORMULA PROGRAMS

     The formula grant programs, Sections 9, 16(b)(2), and 18, are
authorized at a $17.4 billion level over the 6 years.

     The Section 9 formula grant program makes funds available on
the basis of a statutory formula to all urbanized areas in the
country.  The program is authorized at $16.1 billion for the 6
years.  For the first time, Section 9 funds may be used for highway
projects in "Transportation Management Areas" (all areas over
200,000 and any other areas which the Governor requests), if all
needs related to the Americans with Disabilities Act are met, the
MPO approves, and there is a balanced local approach to funding
highways and transit.

21

     The Section 18 program provides funds on the basis of a
statutory formula to rural areas.  The program is funded at $937
million for the 6 years.  Its share is established at 5.5 percent
of the total for Sections 9 and 18, up from 2.93 percent in
previous law.  A new requirement is that a State must use 5 percent
of the funds it receives in FY 1992, 10 percent in FY 1993, and 15
percent in FY 1994 for intercity bus service projects, unless the
State certifies that intercity bus needs have been met.

     The formula factors do not change.  However, areas under
200,000 get a slightly larger share: 9.32 percent of the Section 9
amount, and larger areas receive 90.68 percent.

     The Section 16(b)(2) program provides transportation services
for elderly and disabled persons.  The program authorization is
established at 1.34 percent of the total program or $428 million. 
The current administrative practice to allocate these funds to the
States is made statutory.  The funds may go to private, non-profit
organizations or to public bodies which coordinate service.  Funds
can continue to be used for capital,costs or for capital costs of
contracting for services.

     Operating assistance is continued as an eligible expense under
Section 9. Operating assistance caps will be adjusted for inflation
for all areas, not just those under 200,000 as is the case in
previous law.

SECTION 3 DISCRETIONARY
AND FORMULA CAPITAL PROGRAM

     The Section 3 program is authorized at $12.4 billion for the 6
years.  Funds are split 40 percent for New Starts, 40 percent for
Rail Modernization, and 20 percent for bus and other.

New Starts

     Authorizations for new starts total $5.0 billion.  New Starts
projects must meet the criteria that they are:

1)   Based on the results of alternatives analysis and
     preliminary engineering;


                                 22


2)   justified based on mobility improvement, environmental
     benefit, cost effectiveness, and operating efficiency; and

3)   Supported by an acceptable degree of local financial
     commitment.

     Projects may not advance from alternative analysis to
preliminary engineering, unless the project meets the requirements
for project justification and local financial commitment, and is
considered likely to do so at the end of preliminary engineering.

     The criteria are waived if:

     1)   The project is in an extreme or severe nonattainment area
          and the plan is on the State Implementation Plan,

     2)   The project requires less than $25 million in Section 3
          funds,

     3)   The Federal share is less than one-third, or

     4)   The project is funded entirely with FHWA funds.

     A substantial number of New Starts projects are earmarked in
the bill.

     Projects are to be funded using Letters of Intent and Full
Funding Grant Agreements.  The sum of out year commitments may not
exceed the amount authorized, although contingent commitments equal
to one-half the uncommitted cash balance in the Mass Transit
Account may be made.

Rail Modernization

     Authorizations for the Section 3 Rail Modernization Funds, a
total of $5 billion over the 6 years, are allocated by formula
rather than on a discretionary basis as in previous law.  The
formula uses statutory percentages to allocate the first $492
million to the II historic rail cities.  The next $70 million is
allocated one-half to the historic rail cities and one-half to all
cities with fixed guideways at least 7-years-old (and any other
fixed guideway city which can demonstrate rehabilitation needs), on
the basis of the Section 9 Rail Tier formula factors.  Any
remaining funds are allocated to the same cities.


23

Bus and Other

     Authorizations for bus and other projects total $2.5 billion.

     At least 5.5 percent of Section 3 Bus funds must be used in
non-urbanized areas.

MATCHING RATIO

     The basic matching ratio for capital projects is
80 percent Federal, the same as for highway projects in the FHWA
program.  This is the same as previous law for Section 9, but is an
increase from the present 75 percent for Section 3.

     The matching ratio is 90 percent Federal for the incremental
costs of bus-related equipment needed to meet the requirements for
the Clean Air Act and Americans with Disabilities Act.

     The matching ratio for operating assistance remains at 50
percent of net operating costs.

TRANSIT PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM

     A new comprehensive transit planning and research program is
funded as a 3 percent takedown of the total amount of funding
provided.  A total of $944 million is authorized over 6 years. 
This program combines the former Sections: 6 Research, 8 Planning,
10 Managerial Training, 11 (a) University Research, 18(h) Rural
Transportation Assistance Program (RTAP), and 20 Human Resources
Programs.  Of these funds, 45 percent is for Metropolitan Planning,
5 percent for RTAP, 10 percent will go to States for planning,
research, and training, 10 percent for a new Transit Cooperative
Research Program, and 30 percent for a National Planning and
Research Program.

     The National Planning and Research Program includes a transit
technology development program, and establishes an Industry
Technical Panel to assist in identification of priority technology
development areas.

                                 24

     A new Transit Cooperative Research Program, modeled after the
National Cooperative Highway Research Program, will conduct problem
solving research for transit operators.  The program will have an
independent governing board and will be managed by the National
Academy of Sciences.

     The metropolitan planning provisions in this title basically
parallel those in the highway title.  Metropolitan planning funds
are allocated to the States under a formula apportionment on behalf
of MPO'S.  States will pass though these funds to MPO's based on a
State formula cooperatively developed with MPO's and approved by
the Secretary.


                                 25

TITLE IV

Motor Carrier Act of 1991


     Title IV of the Act relates to motor carriers.  It
reauthorizes the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program,
establishes deadlines for States to participate in the
International Registration Plan (IRP) and International Fuel Tax
Agreement (IFTA), directs the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC)
to establish a new program for motor carriers with ICC operating
authority to register with States, and imposes a freeze on State
requirements and limitations on the operation of trucks with double
or triple trailers that weigh more than 80,000 pounds.

MOTOR CARRIER
SAFETY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (MCSAP)

     MCSAP funds State enforcement of Federal truck and bus safety
requirements or compatible safety requirements.  States also may
use MCSAP funds to support drug interdiction, vehicle weight, and
traffic enforcement.  The Act authorizes a total of $479 million.

STATE PARTICIPATION IN IRP AND IFTA

     By September 30, 1996, States must join the International
Registration Plan, a base-State agreement for the registration of
trucks and buses operating in different States.  Likewise, States
must join the International Fuel Tax Agreement, a similar agreement
for fuel taxes, by September 30, 1996.  The Act authorizes a total
of $30 million for grants to States for technical assistance,
training, and equipment associated with participation in IRP and
IFTA.  It also authorizes $6 million to fund a working group of
State and local government officials which must report in 2 years
with recommendations on improving IRP and IFTA.

SINGLE-STATE REGISTRATION

     The Act eliminates the bingo stamp program associated with 39
States' requirements for interstate motor carriers to register
their Interstate Commerce Commission operating authority.  In its
place, the ICC must establish a base-State system, whereby a motor
carrier would register its ICC-operating authority and provide
proof of required liability insurance with one

27


State, and that State will distribute the collected fees to other
participating States in which the carrier's vehicles operate.

LONGER COMBINATION VEHICLES (LCV)

The Act limits the operation of double and triple trailer
combinations with gross weights in excess of 80,000 pounds to the
States in which they were operating on June 1, 199 1, and prohibits
the expansion of routes or the removal of operating restrictions
after that date.  States must submit information on LCV limitations
and requirements to the FHWA within 60 days of enactment.  The FHWA
will publish an interim list of the requirements and limitations in
the Federal Register within 90 days of enactment and a final list
within 180 days.  The FHWA also will study the operation and safety
of longer combination vehicles.



                                 28

TITLE V

Intermodal Transportation


     The purpose of Title V is to promote intermodal
transportation.

     The focus of the intermodal effort will be a new Office of
Intermodalism, established within the Office of the Secretary of
Transportation.  The office will maintain and disseminate
intermodal transportation data, and coordinate Federal research on
intermodal transportation.

     The Secretary is authorized to make available $3 million in
grants to States to develop model intermodal transportation plans. 
These plans must include systems for collecting data.

     The Act establishes a National Commission on Intermodal
Transportation to study the status of intermodal standardization,
intermodal impacts on public works infrastructure, legal
impediments to efficient intermodal transportation, financial
issues, new technologies, problems in documenting intermodal
transfers of freight, research and development needs, and the
relationship of intermodal transportation to productivity.  The
report is due to Congress by September 30, 1993.


                                 29


TITLE VI

Research

     This title, covering transportation research, is divided into
three parts:

Part A- Programs, Studies and Activities,
Part B- Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems Act, and 
Part C- Advanced Transportation Systems and Electric Vehicles.

PART A - PROGRAMS, STUDIES, AND ACTIVITIES

Research and Technology

     Substantial support is provided for enhanced research and
development and the effective application of innovative technology
to solve highway problems.  An important provision related to this
initiative is new authority for collaborative research and
development with other public and private entities, with an average
Federal share up to 50 percent of the activity costs.

     The Act provides a total of $108 million to implement the
products of the completed Strategic Highway Research Program and to
continue the Long Term Pavement Performance Program.

     To expand technology transfer activities, the Act provides
authority to carry out a transportation assistance program to
supply modern technology to highway and transportation agencies in
rural areas and in urbanized areas of 50,000 to 1,000,000
population.  Technology Transfer centers may be established for
this purpose.

     A new Applied Research and Technology Program is required to
provide accelerated testing, evaluation, and implementation of
technologies designed to improve the durability, efficiency,
environmental impact, productivity, and safety of highway, transit,
and intermodal transportation systems.  Program guidelines from the
Secretary are required within 18 months, and a total of $240
million is authorized with a Federal share of 80 percent.


                                 31

     The Act provides a strong focus on planning and guidance for
the research and development agenda.  The Secretary is to develop
an integrated national plan for surface transportation research and
development.  Also, a National Council on Surface Transportation
Research, as well as a new Research Advisory Committee, are
created.  The Council will study: current surface transportation
research and technology developments in the United States and
abroad; identify gaps and duplication; and determine research areas
which may increase efficiency, productivity, safety, and durability
in the Nation's surface transportation systems.

     The Committee will provide ongoing advice and recommendations
to the Secretary regarding issues with respect to short-term and
long-term surface transportation research and development.

International Highway
Transportation Outreach Program

     A new International Highway Transportation Outreach Program
will provide for informing the U.S. highway community of foreign
transportation innovations, promoting U.S. highway transportation
expertise internationally, and increasing the transfers of U.S.
highway transportation technology to foreign countries.

Bureau of Transportation Statistics

     A Bureau of Transportation Statistics is created in the DOT to
enhance data collection, analysis, and reporting, and to ensure the
most cost-effective use of transportation monitoring resources.  A
total of $90 million is provided over the 6 years of the Act.  The
Bureau is to publish a Transportation Statistics Annual Report; the
first report is due January 1, 1994.

National Transit Institute

     A National Transit Institute is established to conduct
training programs for all involved in Federal-aid transit work. 
Funding is $18 million over the 6 years of the authorization.


                                 32


University Transportation Centers/Research Institutes

     Five new university transportation centers have been added to
the University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program.  These
centers, as well as the original 10 UTC's are funded by both the
FHWA and the FTA.

     Also, five additional university research institutes are
established.  Funding is from the Highway Trust Fund, other than
the Mass Transit Account, and is in the amount of $37.5 million
over the 6-year period.

PART B - INTELLIGENT VEHICLE-HIGHWAY SYSTEMS ACT

     An Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems (IVHS) Program is
established, with approximately $660 million authorized for the 6-
year authorization period.

     The Act requires the promotion of compatible standards and
protocols to promote widespread use of IVHS technologies, the
establishment of evaluation guidelines for IVHS operational tests,
and the establishment of an information clearinghouse.

     A strategic plan must be submitted to Congress no later than I
year after this Act is effective.  The plan must include the goals,
mile-stones, and objectives of the IVHS program.

     The Act also requires development of a completely automated
highway and vehicle system which will serve as the prototype for
future fully automated IVHS systems.  The goal is to have the first
fully automated roadway or test track in operation by the end of
1997.  An IVHS Corridors program is established to provide for
operational tests under "real world" conditions.  Corridors which
meet certain transportation and environmental criteria can
participate in developing and implementing IVHS technologies.

     Other provisions relating to IVHS include authority to use
advisory committees for carrying out the IVHS program and the
availability of planning grants to State and local governments for
studying the feasibility for development and implementation of
IVHS.

                                 33


PART C - ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION
SYSTEMS AND ELECTRIC VEHICLES

     A grant program is established for electrical vehicle and
advanced transportation research and development.  The grants will
be awarded to at least three consortia that must provide services
including obtaining funding for the acquisition of plant sites,
conversion of plant facilities, and acquisition of equipment for
the development or manufacture of advanced transportation systems
or electric vehicles, or other related systems or equipment,
especially for environmentally benign and cost-effective
manufacturing processes.  The non-Federal share of the grants must
be at least 50 percent.


                                 34


TITLE VII

                         Air Transportation


     This title concerns amendments to the Metropolitan Washington
Airports Act of 1986.



                                 35


TITLE VIII

Extension of Highway-Related Taxes
and Highway Trust Fund


     The Highway Trust Fund, which is the source of funding for
most of the categories in Titles I, II, III, IV, and VI, is
extended to the end of FY 1999.  This means that highway-related
user taxes, which were scheduled to expire at the end of FY 1995,
have been extended 4 years.  The tax rate on motor fuel will be
reduced by 2.5 cents per gallon after September 30, 1995.  The rate
per gallon then will be 11. 5 cents for gasoline and special fuels
and 17.5 cents for highway diesel fuel.

     The Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund will be
credited with 1.5 cents per gallon of the motor-fuel taxes, with
the remainder going to the Highway Account.  This Act allows
expenditures from the Mass Transit Account for "capital-related" as
well as for "capital" purposes.

     A National Recreational Trails Trust Fund is established to
support the National Recreational Trails Funding Program.  Monies
transferred to this Trust Fund will be equivalent to 0.3 percent of
total Highway Trust Fund receipts in the first year, and
afterwards, to "nonhighway recreational fuel taxes." These taxes
are from fuel purchased for use on recreational trails and in
outdoor recreational equipment (e.g., camp stoves).

     The National Highway Institute, which conducts training
programs for Federal, State, and local highway employees, may now
include training for employees of private agencies.  The Institute
also may now charge fees to users of its training programs as long
as they do not exceed the costs of the services provided.



                                 37



TABLE 1 Authorizations (millions)

     PROGRAM                                 1992           1993

TITLE I
     Interstate Construction Program         1,800.00  1,800.00
     Interstate Substitute Program             240.00    240.00
     Interstate Maintenance Program          2,431.00  2,913.00
     National Highway System                 3,003.00  3,599.00
     Surface Transportation Program          3,418.00  4,096.00
     Congestion Mitigation and
     Air Quality Improvement Program          858.00   1,028.00
     Bridge Program                         2,288.00   2,762.00
     Federal Lands Highway Programs:          371.00     445.00
     Indian Reservation Roads                (159.00)  (191.00)
     Public Lands Highway                    (143.00)  (171.00)
     Parkways and Park Highways               (69.00)   (83.00)
     Donor State Bonus Amounts                429.00    514.00
     Reimbursement for non-Federally
     aided Interstate Segments                  0.00     0.00
     Hold Harmless *                           606.6    606.6
     90% of Payment Adjustments                 0.00    83.00
     Additional Allocation-Wisconsin           40.00    47.80
     Highway Use Tax Evasion Projects           5.00     5.00
     Highway Use Tax Evasion Projects-GF        2.50     2.50
     Scenic Byways Program                      1.00     3.00
     Interim Scenic Byways Program             10.00    10.00
     Ferry Boat and Facilities Construction    14.00    17.00
     Emergency Relief                         100.00   100.00
     Arkansas Traffic Control Device            1.20     0.00
     Minimum Allocation                     1,160.00   803.40
     Projects:                                542.62  1,225.46
     High Cost Bridge Projects               (22.82)   (52.48)
     Congestion Relief Projects              (39.20)   (90.17)
     High Priority NHS Corridors             (94.65)  (270.99)
     Rural Access Projects                   (73.65)  (169.40)
     Urban Access and Mobility Projects      (44.49)  (102.32)
     Innovative Projects                     (232.85) (459.71)
     Priority Intermodal Projects            (34.96)   (80.40)
     High Priority NHS Corridor Studies        8.00      8.00
     High Priority NHS Corridor Revolving 
     Fund                                      0.00     40.00
     Infrastructure Awareness Education 
     Program                                   2.00      0.00
     Safety Belts and Motorcycle Helmets      17.00  Cnt'd as $24
     Trauma Study                            (5.00)     0.00
     FHWA Highway Safety (402) Program        17.00    20.00
     FHWA Highway R&D Safety (403) Program    10.00    10.00
     National Magnetic Levitation Dev't-TF     5.00    45.00
     High-Speed Ground Transportation 
     Dev't.-TF                                 0.00    5.00
     National Magnetic Levitation Dev't-GF   225.00    0.00
     High-Speed Ground Transportation 
     Dev't-GF                                 25.00    0.00
     High-Speed Ground Transportation         25.00    0.00
     Development R&D-GF
     Railroad Relocation Demonstration 
     Program-TF                               10.00    10.00
     Railroad Relocation Demonstration 
     Program-GF                                5.00    5.00
     Private Sector Involvement Program-GF     5.00    5.00
     Miscellaneous Highway Projects          987.20    0.00
     Recreational Trails                     30.00     30.00

     TITLE I TOTAL                      18,692.12      20,478.76


     *ESTIMATED AMOUNTS



                                 38


1994           1995           1996           1997      Total

1,800.00       1,800.00       0.00           0.00       7,200.00
  240.00         240.00       0.00           0.00         960.00
2,914.00       2,914.00   2,914.00       2,914.00      17,000.00
3,599.00       3,599.00   3,600.00       3,600.00      21,000.00
4,096.00       4,096.00   4,097.00       4,097.00      23,900.00

1,028.00       1,028.00   1,029.00       1,029.00       6,000.00
2,762.00       2,762.00   2,763.00       2,763.00      16,100.00
  445.00         445.00     447.00         447.00       2,600.00
 (191.00)       (191.00)   (191.00)       (191.00)     (1,114.00)
 (171.00)       (171.00)   (172.00)       (172.00)     (1,000.00)
  (83.00)        (83.00)    (84.00)        (84.00)       (486.00)
  514.00         514.00     514.00         515.00       3,000.00

    0.00           0.00   2,000.00       2,000.00       4,000.00
   606.6          606.6      606.6           606.6      3,639.60
   83.00          83.00      83.00          83.00         415.00
   47.80          47.80      47.80          47.80         279.00
    5.00           5.00       5.00           5.00          30.00
    2.50           2.50       2.50            2.50         15.00
    4.00          14.00      14.00           14.00         50.00
   10.00           0.00       0.00            0.00         30.00
   17.00          17.00      17.00           18.00        100.00
  100.00         100.00     100.00          100.00        600.00
    0.00           0.00       0.00            0.00          1.20
  803.40         803.40     803.40          803.40      5,177.00
1,158.85       1,100.52   1,100.52        1,100.52      6,228.49
  (52.48)        (52.48)    (52.48)         (52.48)     (285.20)
  (90.17)        (90.17)    (90.17)         (90.17)     (490.04)
 (204.38)       (204.38)   (204.38)        (204.38)    (1,183.16)
 (169.40)       (169.40)   (169.40)          (169,40)    (920.63)
 (102.32)       (102.32)   (102.32)          (102.32)    (556.10)
 (459.71)       (401.38)   (401.38)          (401.38)  (2,356.41)
  (80.40)        (80.40)    (80.40)           (80.40)    (436.95)
    8.00            8.00      8.00              8.00       48.00
   40.00           40.00      40.00            40.00      200.00
    0.00            0.00      0.00              0.00        2.00

million drawdown from Sec. 402 for 93 - 94.       17.00
    0.00           0.00       0.00              0.00      (5.00)
   20.00          20.00       20.00            20.00     117.00
   10.00          10.00       10.00            10.00      60.00
  100.00         100.00      125.00           125.00     500.00
    5.00           5.00        5.00             5.00      25.00
    0.00           0.00        0.00             0.00     225.00
    0.00           0.00        0.00             0.00      25.00
    0.00           0.00        0.00             0.00      25.00

   10.00           0.00        0.00             0.00      30.00
    5.00           0.00        0.00             0.00      15.00
    5.00           5.00        5.00             5.00      30.00
    0.00           0.00        0.00             0.00     987.20
   30.00          30.00       30.00            30.00     180.00

20,469.15      20,395.82   20,386.82         20,388.82 120,811.49

                                 39

TABLE 1 Authorizations (millions)

PROGRAM                                      1992           1993

TITLE 11
NHTSA Highway Safety (402) Program            126.00        171.00
NHTSA Highway R&D Safety (403) Program         44.00         44.00
Drug Recognition Expert Training Program        4.00          4.00

National Driver Register Act Authorizations     4.00Continuesas $4
     Alcohol Traffic Safety Incentive Grants   25.00Continues as$25
     Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety          68.72         71.33
     Motor Vehicle Information                  6.49          6.73
     and Cost Savings Programs

TITLE II TOTAL                                278.21         297.06

TITLE III
MASS TRANSIT
     Section 3 Discretionary and Formula     1,342.17     2,030.00
     New Starts                               (536.87)   (812.00)
     Rail Modernization Formula               (536.87)   (812.00)
     Bus                                      (268.43)   (406.00)
     Section 9 Formula Capital & Operating   1,822.76   2,604.14
     Section 18 Rural                          106.09     151.56
     Interstate Transfer-Transit               160.00     164.84
     Section 16(b)(2)                           54.88      70.15
     Transit Planning and Research             109.12     157.05
     National                                 (39.51)    (45.62)
     State                                     (8.96)    (14.96)
     Cooperative                               (8.96)    (14.96)
     Sec. 8 MPO Planning                      (43.69)    (70.67)
     Rural Transit Assistance Program          (5.00)     (7.85)
     National Transit Institute                (2.99)     (3.00)
     University Transportation Centers          6.99       7.00
     Program Administration                    37.00      50.26

TITLE III TOTAL                              3,639.01  5,235.00

TITLE IV
     MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY
     Motor Carrier Safety Grants Programs      65.00       76.00
     Motor Carrier Safety Functions            49.32        0.00
     Longer Combination Vehicles                1.00        1.00
     Uniformity                                 6.00Continues as $6

     TITLE IV TOTAL                            121.32       77.00

     TITLE VI
     RESEARCH
     Bureau of Transportation Statistics          5.00      10.00
     Bus Testing                                  3.99       0.00
     Howard Transportation Information Center     2.24       0.00
     Nat'l. Center for Advanced                   2.50       3.00
     Transportation Technology
     University Transportation Centers            5.00       6.00
     University Research Institutes               6.25       6.25
     Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems         94.00     113.00

     TITLE VI TOTAL                             118.98      138.25
___________________________________________________________________
     TOTAL                                   22,849.63    26,226.07
___________________________________________________________________
     Highway Trust Fund-Highway Account 17,805.91 20,903.01
     Highway Trust Fund-Transit Account 1,900.00  2,875.00
     General Funds  3,143.72  2,448.06

40


1994           1995           1996           1997      Total

  171.00       171.00         171.00         171.00    981.00
   44.00        44.00          44.00          44.00    264.00
    4.00         4.00           4.00           4.00     24.00
million drawdown from Sec. 402 for 93 and 94.            4.00
million drawdown from Sec. 402 for 93 - 97.             25.00
   74.04        76.86           0.00           0.00    290.95
    6.99         7.25           0.00           0.00     27.46
  -------      -------        ------         ______    _______
  300.03       303.11         219.00         219.00  1,616.40


2,050.00       2,050.00       2,050.00       2,900.00  12,422.17
 (820.00)       (820.00)       (820.00)    (1,160.00)  (4,968.87)
 (820.00)       (820.00)       (820.00)    (1,160.00)  (4,968.87)
 (410.00)       (410.00)       (410.00)      (580.00)  (2,484.43)
2,642.57       2,642.57       2,642.57       3,741.02  16,095.64
  153.80         153.80         153.80         217.73     936.78
    0.00           0.00           0.00           0.00     324.84
   68.68          68.68          68.68          97.15     428.21
  153.75         153.75         153.75         217.50     944.92
  (44.62)       (44.62)        (44.62)        (63.75)   (282.75)
  (14.62)       (14.62)        (14.62)        (21.00)    (88.79)
  (14.62)
  (14.62)       (14.62)        (21.00)       (88.79)
  (69.19)       (69.19)        (69.19)       (97.88)   (419.80)
  (7.69)         (7.69)         (7.69)       (10.87)    (46.79)
  (3.00)         (3.00)         (3.00)        (3.00)    (17.99)
   7.00           7.00           7.00           7.00     41.99
  49.20          49.20          49.20          69.60    304.46

5,125.00       5,125.00       5,125.00       7,250.00  31,499.01


  80.00          83.00           85.00          90.00    479.00
   0.00           0.00             0.00          0.00     49.32
   1.00           0.00             0.00          0.00      3.00

million drawdown from MCS Grants for 93 - 97.               6.00

  81.00          83.00             85.00        90.00     537.32


  15.00          15.00             20.00          25.00     90.00
   0.00           0.00              0.00           0.00      3.99
   0.00           0.00              0.00           0.00      2.24
   2.50           0.00              0.00           0.00      8.00

   6.00           6.00              6.00            6.00    35.00
   6.25           6.25              6.25            6.25    37.50
 113.00         113.00             113.00         113.00    659.00

 142.75         140.25             145.25         150.25    835.73

26,117.93    26,047.18           25,961.07     28,098.07 155,299.96

20,901.93    20,833.07           20,831.07     20,843.07 122,118.03
2,975.00      2,875.00            2,775.00      4,800.00  18,200.00
2,241.03      2,339.11            2,355.00      2,455.00  14,981.92

41


TABLE 2

Federal Share and Availability
For Significant Programs



                              Federal Share            Availability
Program                          Percent                  Years

Interstate Construction            90                       1
Interstate Substitution            85                       2
Interstate Maintenance             90                       4
National Highway System            80                       4
Surface Transportation Program     80                       4
Congestion Mitigation and
     Air Quality Program           80                       4
Bridge Replacement and
     Rehabilitation Program        80                       4
Federal Lands                      100                      4
TollRoads                          50 - 80                  N/A
Transit Capital
     Section 3                     80             Until Expended
     Section 9                     80                       4
     Section 18                    80                       3
     Section 16 (b)(2)             80                       1
Transit Operating                  50                       4
National Magnetic Levitation

     Prototype                     75-90          Until Expended
National High-Speed Ground
Transportation Technology
     Demonstration                 80             Until Expended
Demonstration Projects             80             Until Expended
Highway Safety Programs            80                       4
Motor Carrier Safety Assistance    80             Secretary-
                                                  until expended;
                                                  States - 2 years
IVHS Corridors Program             80                       4

                                 42


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