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Corridors 2020 - Review and Update - June, 1994



Click HERE for graphic.



MISSION STATEMENT
TRANSLINKS21- Wisconsin's 21st century transportation plan-will
outline a comprehensive transportation system that moves people and
goods efficiently, strengthens our economy, protects our environment,
and supports our quality of life.  Working with DOT, the public will
identify Wisconsin's transportation needs-and help to make tomorrow's
transportation choices.

Tommy G. Thompson,
Governor

Charles H. Thompson
Secretary



CORRIDORS 2020

Review and Update




Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Translinks 21 Multimodal Planning Program




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



This publication was prepared by the Wisconsin Department of
Transportation, Division of Planning and Budget.  The principal
authors of this document were Kwame Arhin, Highway Planning Unit, and
Dawn Krahn, Highway Planning Unit.  Randall Wade, Chief of the
Statewide System Planning Section, provided overall project direction.

Others providing significant input for this document include: Ron
Atkinson, Highway Planning Unit; George Gundersen, Director of the
Bureau of System Planning; Doug Dalton, Chief of the Urban System
Planning Section; David Cipra, Supervisor of the Highway Planning
Unit; Dan Yeh, Multimodal Planning Unit; and Bernard van de Kamp,
Highway Planning Unit.

Computer graphics for maps in this document were provided by Sandra
Anderson, Statewide System Planning; David Beyer, Statewide System
Planning; and Kelly Schieldt, Statewide System Planning.


Corridors 2020



 
                           TABLE OF CONTENTS



PREFACE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

THE CORRIDORS 2020 PLAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

     Multilane Backbone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
     Connector System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

HOW WILL OTHER INTERCITY TRANSPORTATION MODES IMPACT        
CORRIDORS 2020?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

HOW WERE THE CORRIDORS 2020 ROUTES DETERMINED? . . . . . . . . . . . 8

     The Backbone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

     The Connector System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
 
Corridors 2020






PREFACE

This report documents a review and update of the Corridors 2020 Plan
for a statewide highway network designed to provide essential links to
key centers throughout the state.  The purpose of the Corridors 2020
update is to use the latest available data to confirm or make
adjustments to the Corridors 2020 system, which was last updated in
July, 1990.  This update is conducted as an element of the Translinks
21 Multimodal Transportation Plan.  Because the Translinks 21 planning
process is an ongoing one, the findings that follow may be refined as
the Translinks 21 Plan is finalized.

In March 1993, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT)
initiated Translinks 21.  This long-range planning process will shape
a comprehensive, integrated, multimodal transportation blueprint to
set the framework for our future policies, programs and investments. 
Translinks 21 will guide the development of our transportation system
into the 21st century.  It will address the highways, airports,
railroads, waterports and urban transportation systems that carry
people and goods throughout Wisconsin and to the nation and the rest
of the world.

As an element of the Translinks 21 Multimodal Transportation Plan,
this update of the Corridors 2020 Plan provides the highway linkages
for a multimodal system that will - provide safe, dependable access to
and from Wisconsin communities and help promote regional and statewide
economic development.

The Corridors 2020 Plan was introduced by Governor Tommy Thompson on
August 3, 1988, as a new long-range highway and economic development
plan.  It was promptly endorsed by the public at hearings throughout
the state and then by the state Legislature.  It was subsequently

updated by the Department in July, 1990.  This plan was designed to
enhance Wisconsin's future economic development and to meet our
mobility needs into the next century.  Since transportation affects
nearly every aspect of life in Wisconsin, the plan will have major
impacts for our businesses and citizens.

The updated Corridors 2020 highway system described herein is based on
socioeconomic factors such as the location of urban population
concentrations, manufacturing centers, and tourism, agricultural and
forestry activity, as well as other highway planning concerns such as
capacity needs and existing and forecasted commercial traffic.  The
underlying criteria and data used to develop this update are even more
compelling today than in 1988.  The overall traffic volumes are higher
today than they were in 1988 and forecast to be even higher in the
future.  Also, this update recognizes that the Corridors 2020 network
is a component of the National Highway System (NHS) and provides
linkages to this critical national system.

In addition to the economic development benefits realized from
Corridors 2020, individual users of the corridors will also benefit
from these proposed improvements.  The motorist traveling for weekend
recreation or personal business will enjoy improved travel time, safer
roads and improved connections to other modes.  For example, Mrs.
Miller can drive from Platteville to Madison on a multilane backbone
highway -- Hwy 151 -- to link with a proposed Amtrak terminal in
Madison for a train trip to Milwaukee.  A freight transporter from
Shawano may move materials on Hwy 29 -- a Corridors 2020 route -- to
Green Bay intermodal terminals to connect with intermodal freight
trains in a seamless process.

Corridors 2020                                         Page 1





Click HERE for graphic.


Corridors 2020                                         Page 2


 
THE CORRIDORS 2020 PLAN

As confirmed by this review and update, the Corridors 2020 Plan is a
statewide network of improved and existing facilities comprised of two
elements: 1) a 1,550-mile backbone system of multilane divided
highways interconnecting all regions and major economic centers in the
state and tying them to the national transportation network; and 2) a
2,100-mile system of two and four lane high quality connectors
directly linking other significant economic and tourism centers to the
backbone system.  Together, these two components will create a 3,650-
mile network linking Wisconsin communities to the nation's Interstate
and multilane highway systems for improved access to national and
world markets.  Nearly all cities and villages in Wisconsin with a
population over 5,000 will be within five miles of either a backbone
or connector route.  Furthermore, Corridors 2020 will also link the
communities with intermodal connections throughout the state.

Multilane Backbone System

The completed multilane backbone system will consist of 1,550 miles of
interconnected freeways and expressways.  Today, 1,200 miles are
completed and the remaining 350 miles are programmed to be completed
by the year 2005.  This 1994 Corridors 2020 analysis shows that all of
the previously designated backbone routes again meet the criteria for
multilane backbone routes. Thus, there are no changes in the highways 
designated as part of the backbone system.  A fundamental core of our
completed backbone network is the 640-mile Interstate system. 
Sufficient funding must be devoted to preserve the utility of this
critical core.

The most significant of the backbone corridors left to be completed
are:

         Highway 29 providing an east-west link across the center of
          the state;

         Highway 10 providing an east-west link serving the Fox
          Cities;

         Highway 151 serving the southwestern region of Wisconsin and
          linking the Fox Valley with growing markets in the
          southwestern part of the country;

         Highway 53 linking northwestern Wisconsin to the Interstate
          system and the central part of the state;

         Highway 41 serving the northeastern region of Wisconsin;

         Highway 41 linking Milwaukee to Green Bay and the Fox
          Cities, converted to freeway.

Newly constructed portions of the backbone corridor system will
generally be built as high quality four-lane expressways, designed to
provide most of the safety and service characteristics of a freeway
but at a lower cost, and with fewer environmental impacts.  Typically,
these highways will provide interchanges at high volume intersecting
highways, with most highways intersecting at grade.  Turning lanes
will be provided at most intersections.  Although some direct
residential access to the highway may remain, commercial access will
be available only through intersecting public roads.  Bypasses of
communities are planned where necessary to maintain constant highway
speeds, but these bypasses will be built as close as possible to
existing development.  As future traffic needs warrant, some sections
of the backbone system may be converted to freeways.

Corridors 2020                                         Page 3



 
Backbone categories.  The backbone routes were separated into two
categories under the 1994 update.

         Backbone routes.  These backbone routes are either existing
          two-lane routes meeting the criteria for multilane backbone
          construction, or they are current multilane routes without
          predicted congestion problems to the year 2020.

         Existing multilane backbone routes with congestion problems
          projected between now and year 2020, to be evaluated by the
          Congestion Management System. The federal Intermodal Surface
          Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) requires that
          each state develop by October 1, 1996, a Congestion
          Management System (CMS) that addresses highway congestion
          problems from a comprehensive perspective.  The CMS will
          consider alternative intercity and urban modes, demand
          management techniques such as employee trip reduction and
          new technologies such as Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems
          (IVHS), as well as conventional highway improvements.  In
          urbanized areas, the CMS will be developed jointly with
          designated Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOS).


Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 4


 

Connector System

The primary purpose of the 2, 100-mile connector system is to link
other significant economic and tourism centers to the backbone system,
thus better integrating them into the statewide and national
transportation systems.  The connector system will be designed as
high-quality two-lane facilities providing the highest standards of
roadway width, passing opportunities, safety and driving comfort,
where economically feasible.

Additional passing, turning, and hill-climbing lanes will be provided
where needed.  Bypasses will be built around communities, if needed. 
To improve community visibility, larger signs will be provided to
direct motorists to villages and cities served by each route. 
Currently, about 40 percent of the connectors are existing or
programmed as multilane, or will be evaluated for multilane
improvements under the Congestion Management System.  Some segments of
the connectors may be recommended for expansion to four-lane highways
when traffic requires more than two lanes.

Connector route changes.  There have been three changes to the
connector system as the result of the 1994 analysis.

         Highway 29 from Green Bay to Kewaunee is no longer
          classified as a connector.  In the previous update, this
          segment was included as a connector as it provided highway
          access to the carferry service from Kewaunee across Lake
          Michigan.  However, because this ferry service now leaves
          from Manitowoc, this segment did not qualify as a connector
          and the designation was removed.

         Highway 8 -- from Hwy 53 to Hwy 51 and from Hwy 45 to Hwy
          141 -- will be classified as a connector.  This segment
          provides an important east- west link across the northern
          part of the state.  These new segments met the following
          criteria for connectors: service to trade centers, service
          to recreation-tourism counties and service to forestry
          counties.  Like other Corridors 2020 routes, this route is
          also part of the designated National Highway System (NHS).

         Highway 11 from Hwy 151 to Monroe.  This corridor was
          included as it is an important route serving a significant
          agricultural area in the state.  Similarly, this route is
          also part of the designated NHS.

Connector routes no longer under study.  There were several routes
that were designated as "under study" in the July 1990 update that are
no longer considered under study for Corridors 2020.


         Highway 76 and portions of Highway 110 near Appleton are no
          longer classified as connectors.  Intercity travel will be
          adequately served by the planned rerouting of Hwy 45 (over
          Hwy 1 10 and County Hwys D and W).  Therefore, the remaining
          portions of Hwy 110, a portion of Hwy 45 and Hwy 76 near
          Appleton do not need to be part of the Corridors 2020 system
          as they would only provide parallel routes in that area.

         Highway 11 and Highway 81 west of Janesville and Beloit were
          shown as "under study" in the 1990 update, because at that
          time the region was being evaluated in the Rock County
          Regional Transportation Study.  The Rock County study --
          completed in December of 1991 -recommended a bypass south of
          Janesville and a bypass south of Beloit (which will


Corridors 2020                                              Page 5



          be primarily in Illinois).  Therefore, Hwy II (from Monroe
          to Janesville) and Hwy 81 (from Hwy 11 to Beloit) have been
          confirmed as connectors on the Corridors 2020 system.

         Highway 12 from Madison to the Illinois state line has been
          included as a connector with congestion problems to be
          addressed by the Congestion Management System.


Connector categories.  The connector routes were separated into three
different categories under the 1994 update.

         Existing and enumerated multilane connectors.  These
          connectors have already been built to multilane connector
          specifications or have been approved by the Legislature for
          multilane construction.

         Connectors with predicted congestion problems to the year
          2020, to be addressed by the Congestion Management System.

         Other connectors.  These connectors typically lack
          congestion problems for significant lengths of highway.



HOW WILL OTHER INTERCITY TRANSPORTATION MODES IMPACT CORRIDORS 2020?

The Translinks 21 planning process responds to federal mandates in
ISTEA and considers the impacts of the various passenger and freight
modes on each other, as well as the changing economic, mobility and
environmental needs of Wisconsin.  Preliminary data from the
Translinks 21 multimodal planning process have been analyzed to
provide an initial indication of how a multimodal investment strategy
could impact the Corridors 2020 designation.

Travel on Wisconsin highways is expected to increase 1.5% annually
over the next 25 years.  Of principal interest is the degree to which
the promotion of alternative modes of transportation may reduce
congestion by diverting some passenger vehicles and commercial trucks
off various Corridors 2020 highways.

The highway diversion map on the next page, shows a preliminary
analysis of potential passenger travel diversions from highways to
other intercity transportation modes.  These passenger diversion
estimates are based upon analyzing the impact of adding additional
intercity bus, conventional and high speed rail service as called for
under the most expansive Translinks 21 multimodal plan alternative. 
These diversion estimates are preliminary and based upon a newly
developed intercity multimodal trip model.  This data does not reflect
the impact of alternative freight modes nor diversions in urban areas
resulting from improvements in urban transit, bicycle/pedestrian usage
or demand management techniques such as employee trip reduction.

The following examples illustrate the use of the diversion analysis
for intercity passenger trips.  The Translinks 21 multimodal
alternative for the Interstate 94 corridor from Milwaukee to Madison
features an ambitious array of additional passenger service.  This
includes the addition of 12 round trips/day of high speed rail (125
mph), and 4 round trips/day of additional bus service.  This
additional service results in a diversion of approximately 750 auto
trips.  On a typical rural portion of this corridor, 750 autos
represent only a 3.4% diversion of intercity trips.  When truck and
local trips are accounted for, the diversion represents only 2.7% of
all trips.


Corridors 2020                                              Page 6




Other Corridors 2020 routes show similar diversion results.  On the
Highway 29 corridor west of Shawano, alternative mode improvements
considered in the Translinks 21 planning process include the addition
of conventional passenger rail service between Green Bay, Stevens
Point and the Twin Cities on a so-called "northern route", as well as
additional intercity bus service.  These alternative passenger mode
additions result in the diversion of about 50 auto trips, or about
2.0% of intercity passenger trips or 1.3% of total trips.

On the Highway 151 corridor near Platteville, the addition of
intercity bus as well as feeder bus service connecting to high speed
rail service in Madison, results in a diversion of only 75 auto trips,
which is 1.7% of intercity passenger trips or 1. 3 % of total trips.

On the Highway 41 corridor near Lomira, the addition of four round
trips per day of conventional passenger rail service between Green Bay
and Milwaukee along with additional intercity bus frequencies results
in the diversion of 150 auto trips, which is 1.3% of intercity
passenger trips or 0.8% of total trips.

In summary, intercity passenger transportation services -- such as
conventional Amtrak trains, high speed rail, or intercity buses --
have only limited potential to divert significant percentages of
traffic off most Corridors 2020 routes.

Less detailed information is currently available from the Translinks
21 multimodal planning process with regard to freight diversion from
truck to rail.  On a statewide basis, increased


Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 7



intermodal truck/rail activity shows a maximum possible diversion of
about 6% of total forecast truck traffic by year 2020.  It must be
emphasized that this is preliminary data and that actual diversion
amounts will be focused on specific high density intercity corridors
where the development of additional truck/rail intermodal service is
most feasible.

In conclusion, there may be some modal diversion resulting from the
further development of alternative transportation modes, but it is not
likely to have significant impact on future highway capacity needs. 
It must be cautioned that these are preliminary estimates, and the
final Translinks 21 multimodal plan will present a more refined
picture of modal diversion.  Other analysis of future highway capacity
needs -- the most significant being associated with the ISTEA mandated
Congestion Management System (CMS)-- will be conducted by WisDOT to
provide even more detailed information.  The CMS analysis will be
conducted by WisDOT in cooperation with Metropolitan Planning
Organizations (MPOS) in order to provide the most balanced multimodal
approach for further addressing future highway needs in Wisconsin.


HOW WERE THE CORRIDORS 2020 ROUTES DETERMINED?

Corridors 2020 is a strategic investment plan that was developed to
assess individual highway segments and place them in the broad
perspective of a state highway network.  Objective criteria were
applied to each highway under consideration using a combination of
several operational and economic factors.  Meeting one Corridors
criterion is not sufficient for a highway segment to become part of
the system; instead, the Corridors 2020 network is based on a
composite of all factors studied.

The Backbone System

Seven criteria were used to determine the backbone system.  Each of
the maps below identifies the candidate highway segments or counties
meeting those criteria.

Multilane capacity needs.  Included as candidates for the backbone
system were current multilane highways and existing two-lane highways
with projected traffic volumes sufficient to require additional lanes
by 2020, as determined by a capacity analysis process.  Only larger
segments that require capacity improvements over most of their length,
or current multilane segments are shown on the map.  Refer to the
Corridors 2020 system map, as shown on page 2, for current and
emerging congestion problems on existing multilane backbone routes
which will be evaluated under the Congestion Management System.

                 TWO LANE HIGHWAYS WITH CAPACITY NEEDS
                   AND EXISTING MULTI]LANE HIGHWAYS

Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 8





Service to trade centers. The 1994 Wisconsin Place Classification for
Transportation Planning1 was crucial in determining the trade center
classification for Wisconsin communities.  This document is useful for
the Corridors 2020 plan update because it establishes a ranking system
for trade, employment, economic diversity, and population.  By
establishing 10 primary activity centers throughout the state, a more
efficient system of trade and interaction could be defined.  After
determining the influence of -the largest cities upon their
surrounding regions, local trade activity and its linkages to the
national and international economy could be established.

Trade center classification was determined using the following
factors:
         Population
         Employment
         Diversity of employment types
         Property valuation
         Service receipts
         Retail trade
         Wholesale trade

Those highways interconnecting the most significant trade centers
(metropolitan, urban, and regional) became backbone candidates.

When comparing 1988 to 1994 trade center criteria the following
changes occurred: 1) Communities no longer considered urban centers
are: Fond du Lac and Manitowoc/Two Rivers; 2) Communities now
classified as regional centers: Fond du Lac, Manitowoc/Two Rivers,
Ladysmith, Shawano, Portage, Baraboo, Burlington, Lake Geneva,
Oconomowoc, Watertown, West Bend, Sturgeon Bay, Marinette/Menominee,
Winona (MN), Red Wing (MN) and Hudson; 3) Communities no longer
classified as regional centers: Sparta and Tomah.
                                   

                       SERVICE TO TRADE CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.

Service to manufacturing centers.  "In many respects, manufacturing
represents the most important sector in the Wisconsin economy." The
value of Wisconsin's industrial manufacturing output is $94.44 billion
(in 1992 dollars), which is more than 40% of Wisconsin's Gross State
Product.  Wisconsin has retained a significant proportion of its
manufacturing activity, despite a national shift toward a service-
based economy.  This is desirable, because a diverse economy is better
able to weather economic fluctuations than a specialized or non-
diverse one.  However, while the state houses an active manufacturing
base, the nature of these industries is rapidly changing, as evident
in the emergence of "just in time" production.  Manufacturing today is
more dependent upon a reliable surface infrastructure, as interstate
truck travel is essential to both importing and exporting goods and
services.

Corridors 2020                                         Page 9



Manufacturing centers were designated through a county by county
assessment of the following considerations:
    Manufacturing employment
    Value added by manufacturing in dollars 
    Number of manufacturing firms

Highways considered as candidates for the backbone system were those
connecting the most important manufacturing counties (Tier 1) to their
major market areas.  When comparing the 1994 to the 1990 analysis,
there were no changes in Tier I county classifications.

                   SERVICE TO MANUFACTURING CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.


Service to agricultural centers.  Agricultural activity is very
important to Wisconsin's economy and culture.  The state's
agricultural community produces more products than the state consumes,
thereby acting as an export industry.  Furthermore, Wisconsin is the
top producer in the nation of many agricultural commodities, and among
the top for several others.  Wisconsin's cash receipts from
agriculture products was $6.2 billion (in 1992 dollars), which ranks
8th in the nation.' For these reasons, particular attention to the
transportation needs of the agricultural community is important.

Agricultural counties were ranked with respect to their productivity,
which was measured through the use of the following statistics:
vegetables, grain, milk, cattle, hogs, sheep and poultry.

                    SERVICE TO AGRICULTURAL CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 10



Agricultural activity and production is concentrated in the central
and southern portions of the state, as shown by the map.  Highways
considered as candidates for the backbone system were those connecting
the most important agricultural counties (Tier 1) to the markets.

When comparing the 1990 analysis to the 1994 analysis, the following
counties were changed from Tier 2 to Tier 1 (now included for backbone
and connector agricultural criteria): Pierce, Kewaunee and Columbia. 
Also, the following counties changed from Tier I to Tier 2 (included
for connector agricultural criteria rather than backbone): Polk,
Waupaca, Calumet, Monroe, Richland and Washington.

Service to forestry counties.  Forestry-related industries and
activity in Wisconsin have been growing in recent years.' Moreover,
the majority of the forestry growth and activity takes place in the
northern half of the state, although there is also significant
processing along the Mississippi River.  Because this economic sector
is growing at a steady rate, and shows continued promise in the
future, a first-class surface transportation infrastructure is crucial
to move freight products to the marketplace.  The forestry counties
were ranked using the following indicators:
    Pulpwood
    Number of pulp mills
    Saw timber
    Number of sawmills
    Wood consumption

Included as backbone candidates were highways connecting the most
important forestry (Tier 1) counties.  When comparing the 1990 to the
1994 forestry criteria the following counties changed from Tier 2 to
Tier 1: Oconto and Wood.  Also, the following counties changed from
Tier 1 to Tier 2: Douglas, Ashland, Iron, Florence, Menominee,
Washburn, Rusk and Taylor.

                     SERVICE TO FORESTRY COMPOSITE

Click HERE for graphic.

Service to recreation and tourism centers.  Recreation and tourism
have been major components of Wisconsin's economy for decades and
continue to grow.  "A major sector of Wisconsin's service industry
exports is the Hospitality, Recreation, and Tourism (HRT) industry. 
With over 10,000 lakes, 2,000 streams, 49,000 campsites, and almost 5
million acres of hunting land, Wisconsin is a recreational haven for
residents and visitors alike.  Business-related activities (including
business trips, conferences, and conventions) also attract thousands
of visitors to the state annually."' The tourism industry, in short,
is important to the state's aggregate economy.

Recreation and tourism are highly dependent upon highway
transportation for safe and convenient travel to recreational
attractions and vacation areas.  Therefore, service to the state's
most significant concentrations of recreation/tourism is an important
factor in determining the Corridors

Corridors 2020                                              Page 11




2020 system.  Using the standardized ranking method, the following 15
factors were used to determine the routes most critical to the
recreation/tourism industry:
    Number of recreation/tourism related firms
    Number of recreation/tourism related employees
    Number of seasonal restaurants
    Number of lodging firms
    Number of Lodging rooms
    Number of campgrounds
    Number of campsites
    Number of seasonal dwellings
    Number of marina berths and harbors
    Number of state parks and state forests
    State park and state forest visits
    Number of downhill ski runs
    Miles of cross county ski trails
    Miles of snowmobile trails
    Cities with sport teams of statewide significance

                 SERVICE TO RECREATION/TOURISM CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.

Included as backbone candidates are highways connecting the most
important recreation/tourism (Tier 1) counties to the greatest source
of visitors (cities with populations greater than 100,000).  When
comparing the 1988 analysis to the 1994 analysis the following
counties changed from Tier 1 to Tier 2: Marinette, Winnebago and
Columbia.  Waukesha County changed from Tier 2 to Tier 1.

Truck volume.  Truck traffic is a measure of the extent to which a
highway serves regional industrial and agricultural needs.  Included
as candidates for the backbone system are highway segments with
current or predicted average daily truck volumes greater than 1,250 in
1994 or segments that will have volumes greater than 2, 100 by 2020. 
The 1994 truck volumes thresholds are based on those used in 1988,
adjusted to reflect changes in forecasted truck volumes.

                             TRUCK VOLUME

Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                         Page 12




The Connector System

The connector system is intended to tie the next level of economic and
tourism centers to the backbone system.  Therefore, similar criteria
are used in the evaluation of candidates for connector routes.  These
include: service to trade centers, truck volume, service to
manufacturing centers, service to recreation /tourism, centers service
to agriculture, and service to forestry counties.

Service to trade centers.  Connectors were chosen in order to serve
district centers as well as any metropolitan, urban or regional
centers not served by the backbone corridor system.

When comparing the 1988 and 1994. trade centers the following
additional communities were included as district centers: Platteville,
Mondovi, Stoughton and Whitewater.  Also, the following communities
are no longer included as district centers: Lancaster, Spooner,
Ladysmith, Barron, Portage, River Falls and Hudson.

                       SERVICE TO TRADE CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.


Truck volume.  Included as connector candidates were highway segments
with current or predicted average daily truck volumes of greater than
625 in 1994 or greater than 1,050 by 2020.


                             TRUCK VOLUME

Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 13



Service to manufacturing centers.  The connector routes are intended
to provide direct service to the second tier of manufacturing
counties, both in the state and in nearby counties of adjacent states,
as well as any Tier 1 counties not served by the multilane backbone
system.

When comparing the 1988 and 1994 manufacturing criteria, Chippewa
County changed from Tier 3 to Tier 2. Waupaca County changed from Tier
2 to Tier 3.


                   SERVICE TO MANUFACTURING CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.


Service to recreation and tourism centers.   Connector candidates
provide direct service to Tier 2 counties (in Wisconsin and in nearby
counties in neighboring states) as well as any Tier I counties not
served by the backbone routes.  When comparing 1988 to 1994 criteria
Burnett, Washburn, Iron, Rock, Racine, Kenosha and Waushara counties
changed from Tier 2 to Tier 3.

                 SERVICE TO RECREATION/TOURISM CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.


Corridors 2020                                              Page 14



Service to agricultural centers.  Connector routes were chosen to
include connections connecting the Tier 2 counties in addition to any
counties not served by the backbone routes.

When comparing the 1990 and 1994 analysis Rusk, Adams and Ozaukee
counties changed from Tier 2 to Tier 3. Also, Taylor, Oconto, Buffalo,
and La Crosse counties changed from Tier 3 to Tier 2.


                    SERVICE TO AGRICULTURAL CENTERS

Click HERE for graphic.


Service to forestry counties.  Connectors were also chosen to serve
Tier 2 forestry counties as well as the Tier I counties not served by
the backbone routes.

When comparing the 1990 and 1994 analysis, the following counties
changed from Tier 2 to Tier 3: Polk, St. Croix, Eau Claire and Brown. 
The following counties changed from Tier 3 to Tier 2: Barron, Dunn,
Trempealeau, Monroe, Juneau, Portage, Waushara, Outagamie, Vernon,
Crawford and Richland.

                     SERVICE TO FORESTRY COMPOSITE

Click HERE for graphic.

Corridors 2020                                              Page 15



 
1.   Wisconsin Department of Transportation. 1994 Wisconsin Place      
     Classification.
     (WisDOT, Division of Planning and Budget.  May, 1994)

2.   Wisconsin Department of Development.  An Economic Analysis of     
           Wisconsin Regions.
     (WisDOT, Division of Policy, Research and Information Services,
     Office of Science and Technology.  May, 1993). p.25.

3.   Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI), Amherst, Massachusetts.

4.   Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer          
        Protection and National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. 
        Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics, 1993. (DATCP, June, 1993).  
        p.5.

5.   Wisconsin Blue Book 1991-1992.  How Wisconsin Ranks among the     
        States in Agriculture, 1989, p. 568.

6.   United States Department of Agriculture.  Wisconsin Timber        
           Industry--An Assessment of Timber Product Output and Use,   
           1990. (North Central Forest Experiment Station, 1993). et.  
           al.

7.   Wisconsin Department of Development.. An Economic Analysis of     
           Wisconsin Regions.
     (WisDOT: Division of Policy, Research, and Information Services,
     Office of Science and Technology.  May, 1993). p. 30.





Corridors 2020                                              Page 16




WISCONSIN 
TRANSLINKS21






FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS TOPIC, CONTACT: RANDALL WADE CHIEF,
STATEWIDE SYSTEMS PLANNING SECTION WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION P.O. BOX 7913 MADISON, WI 53707-7913 608/266-2972 FOR
ADDITIONAL COPIES, CALL: OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS 608/266-3581


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